Fall Hill Bead and Gem

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            Unique crystals and mineral specimens, hand selected by us to provide you with only the finest!
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            Browse our selection of handmade gemstone jewelry, made with precious/semiprecious stones and metals.
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            Herkimer Diamond beads, drilled in house at Fall Hill Bead and Gem! Each drilled Herkimer Diamond crystal is high quality and hand selected. We are proud to offer only the best genuine Herkimer Diamond beads.
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            Our Herkimer Diamond bracelets are handcrafted in our studio in Little Falls, New York. Genuine Herkimer Diamond crystals are sourced from our own material to create heirloom quality jewelry in sterling silver and 14kt gold.
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            Our sweet little Herkimer Diamond charm necklaces are made for every day wear! Light and delightful, they are made from sterling silver and genuine Herkimer Diamond crystals.
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            Herkimer Diamond Crystals (44)

            Herkimer Diamonds are our specialty! We have many Herkimer Diamond quartz crystals, including generators, clusters, skeletals, matrix pieces, and the occasional very rare enhydro diamond. All of our Herkimer Diamond crystal specimens are authentic Herkimer Diamonds that were collected here in central New York. Genuine Herkimer Diamond crystals are only found in Herkimer County, New York. They have 18 natural…
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            Genuine Herkimer Diamond earrings, made by hand at Fall Hill Bead and Gem in Little Falls New York.
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            Genuine Herkimer Diamond jewelry, made in Herkimer County, New York. Each piece is handmade and sourced from our own material.
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            Herkimer Diamond Necklaces (13)

            Our necklaces are made with genuine Herkimer Diamonds from New York. We stock a variety of handcrafted Herkimer Diamond jewelry, made either in house at Fall Hill Bead and Gem. All Herkimer Diamond jewelry pieces are small batch creations and created with the utmost of love and care. All of our Herkimer Diamond jewelry is made with sterling silver, 14kt.…
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            Herkimer Diamond Pendants (4)

            Our Herkimer Diamond pendants are made in-house, with genuine Herkimer Diamonds from Herkimer County, New York. We also stock a variety of other handcrafted Herkimer Diamond jewelry, made with sterling silver, 14kt. gold fill or 14kt. gold. We proudly offer only the best Herkimer Diamond jewelry!
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            Herkimer Diamond Rings (14)

            Our collection of Herkimer Diamond rings feature both raw crystals as well as faceted stones. All stones are sourced from our own material, and are guaranteed to be genuine Herkimer Diamonds. All rings are handmade in our jewelry studio in Little Falls, New York
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            Our tumbled stones are handpicked by us to assure only the best make it to you! We have an extensive inventory of stones, so if there's something you don't see, please ask! We're adding new inventory often, so check in to see what's new.
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Field Trip – Harvard Gem and Mineral Collection – Boston Part One
Extra large Sulphur crystal from Sicily, Italy

Field Trip – Harvard Gem and Mineral Collection – Boston Part One

Growing up in Pittsburgh, we were very lucky to have the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in our back yard. Their gem and mineral collection is one of the top in the world, so we were a bit spoiled in our formative years. However, right before our recent trip to Boston, we were clued in to the fact that Harvard University’s Museum of Natural History has a pretty stellar permanent mineral collection. How could we pass that up? So off to Cambridge we went, and after an outstanding breakfast at Henrietta’s Table (a farm to table restaurant in the Charles Hotel-highly recommended), we headed over to the Harvard mineral collection to see what kinds of treasures it held.

Harvard University, est. 1636
Harvard University,
est. 1636

Upon arriving to the museum, we were pleased to see that we were not going to be disappointed. The colorful mineral collection was sizable and classified by chemical composition, which helps for seeing similarities in the crystals that are made up of similar elements.

The minerals at Harvard are displayed in the flat cases according to their chemical composition, the wall cases house the large mineral collection
The minerals at Harvard are displayed in the flat cases according to their chemical composition, the wall cases house the large mineral collection

The collection is pretty heavy on US minerals (particularly from the Northeastern United States), which was a treat. We’re always interested in seeing what can be collected in our home country, and we were not dissatisfied. Highlights included Goethite, one from Marquette County, Michigan

An incredible example of Goethite from Michigan
An incredible example of Goethite from Michigan

 

and one from California that I was calling Rainbow Goethite due to the light wash of color over the crystals.

colorful California Goethite specimen
colorful California Goethite specimen

 

One that I was unfamiliar with, and suitably impressed by, was a large example of Millerite from Lee County, Iowa. The large clear crystals are Calcite, the Millerite is the tiny metallic hair-like crystals growing on top of them.

Millerite from Iowa in the Harvard University mineral collection
Millerite from Iowa in the Harvard University mineral collection

Being from Pennsylvania, we are always interested to see what minerals the Keystone State has to offer. This specimen of Chalcopyrite was most impressive!

Chalcopyrite from Chester County, Pennsylvania
Chalcopyrite from Chester County, Pennsylvania

 

There were also some superb examples of US Fluorite, including pieces from New Hampshire

a large specimen of Fluorite from the Wise Mine, New Hampshire
a large specimen of Fluorite from the Wise Mine, New Hampshire

and of course Illinois

Fluorite with exceptional color zoning from Cave-in-Rock Illinois
Fluorite with exceptional color zoning from Cave-in-Rock Illinois
Fluorite with exceptional color zoning and an unusual pink to purple hue
Fluorite with exceptional color zoning and an unusual pink to purple hue

Another surprise were the Pyrite suns from Illinois. Usually I just associate Illinois with Fluorite. Not anymore!

Pyrite discs, or
Pyrite discs, or “sun” from Randolph County, Illinois

North Carolina, known for its Emerald, Sapphire and Ruby deposits is also home to several other types of minerals. This piece of Kyanite was particularly entrancing (and gemmy!)

Kyanite in Quartz from North Carolina
Kyanite in Quartz from North Carolina

There were also some fine examples from the Southwestern US. It is generally known for Turquoise, but is also home to a plethora of other types of minerals. Here are some of our favorites that were on display:

Variscite

Variscite from Clay Canyon, Utah
Variscite from Clay Canyon, Utah

Smithsonite

Smithsonite from the Kelly Mine, New Mexico
Smithsonite from the Kelly Mine, New Mexico

Chrysocolla

Chrysocolla from Gila County, Arizona
Chrysocolla from Gila County, Arizona

Quartz var. Chalcedony

Chalcedony from Platte County, Wyoming
Chalcedony from Platte County, Wyoming

Calcite on Malachite

Dogtooth Calcite on Malachite from Arizona
Dogtooth Calcite on Malachite from Arizona

And last but certainly not least, a giant specimen of Amazonite from Colorado

Amazonite from Colorado.
Large Amazonite crystals from Colorado.

 

Of course, there were plenty of other crystals from all over the world to gawk at, and when we were through eyeballing the US collection, we moved on to the worldwide wonders. There were way too many to include in one blog, so here is a choice selection:

Extra large Sulphur crystal from Sicily, Italy
Extra large Sulphur crystal from Sicily, Italy
Fluorite specimen from Spain
Fluorite specimen from Spain
Ferberite from Castelo Branco, Portugal
Ferberite from Castelo Branco, Portugal
Large Morganite crystal from Minas Gerais, Brazil
Large Morganite crystal from Minas Gerais, Brazil
Amethyst Geode with Calcite from Rio Grande Do Sol, Brazil
Amethyst Geode with Calcite from Rio Grande Do Sol, Brazil

 

Large etched Aquamarine crystal from Minas Gerais, Brazil
Large etched Aquamarine crystal from Minas Gerais, Brazil
Rhodochrosite crystal from Peru
Rhodochrosite crystal from Peru
Barite crystals from Cumbria, England
Barite crystals from Cumbria, England
Mesolite
Mesolite specimen from Poona Maharashtra, India

 

elbaite crystal
giant Elbaite from Minas Gerais, Brazil

 

gypsum mexico
Giant Gypsum crystals from Mexico

There was also an impressive collection of Meteorites, with a good number from the US, as well as a very cool interactive display of the formation of the solar system, earth and life on the planet, with examples of the rocks at each stage of the universe’s development. One last thing that really caught our attention was a piece of a deep sea vent that was highly mineralized on the inside

Vent Chimney with Metal Sulfides from the Juan de Fuca Ridge, depth 2100 m
Vent Chimney with Metal Sulfides from the Juan de Fuca Ridge, depth 2100 m

 

It was a fantastic afternoon viewing an extraordinary collection. Definitely worth a visit if you’re in the Boston area. Part Two of the blog will cover the other points of interest we explored in Boston, including the Ware Collection of Blaschka Glass Models of Plants, aka “The Glass Flowers,” which were created beginning in 1886 as models for the University to study. Stay tuned!

 

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